1450 Huie Road Lake City Ga 30260 Phone 770 968 3490

When God is thought of as the supreme all-powerful person (rather than as the infinite principle called Brahma), God is called Īśvara or Bhagavān. Īśvara is a word used to refer to the personal aspect of God in general; it is not specific to a particular deity.

Īśvara transcends gender, yet can be looked upon as both father and mother, and even as friend, child, or sweetheart. Most Hindus, in their daily devotional practices, worship some form of this personal aspect of God, although they believe in the more abstract concept of Brahma as well.

Sometimes this means worshiping God through an image or a picture. Sometimes it just means thinking of God as a personal being.

Depending on which aspect of Īśvara one is talking about, a different name will be used—and frequently a different image or picture. For instance, when God is spoken of as the creator, God is called Brahmā. When spoken of as preserver of the world, God is called Vishnu. When spoken of as destroyer of the world, God is called Shiva.

Many of these individual aspects of God also have other names and images. For example, Krishna and Rama are considered forms of Vishnu. All the various deities and images one finds in Hinduism are considered manifestations of the same God, called Īśvara in the personal aspect and Brahma when referred to as an abstract concept.

In their personal religious practices, Hindus worship primarily one or another of these deities, known as their “ishta devatā,” or chosen ideal. The particular form of God worshipped as one’s chosen ideal is a matter of individual preference. Regional and family traditions can influence this choice. Hindus may also take guidance about this choice from their scriptures.

Although Hindus may worship deities other than their chosen ideal from time to time as well, depending on the occasion and their personal inclinations, they are not required to worship—or even know about—every form of God. Hindus generally choose one concept of God (e.g., Krishna, Rama, Shiva, or Kali) and cultivate devotion to that chosen form, while at the same time respecting the chosen ideals of other people.

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Sumant Center

This center was built in 2002 to help our hindu community for their auspicious and cultural events. Sumant center has three halls, capacity from 200, 1,000 and 6,000 respectively.

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Our Services

Annapurna

Prasaad Gruh:

 

The ‘Annapurna Prasaad Gruh’ of Shree Shakti Mandir provides excellent and FREE Rajbhog Prasaad within the temple to all the devotees since 2003.  Ambaji USA is the ONLY temple in USA provides FREE Prasad 365 days in year from 12 PM to 8 PM. This could not have been possible without Mataji’s blessing and generous donation of devotees like you.  Read More

Our History

Shree Shakti Mandir, AmbajiUSA, has a history that dates back to 1990. That’s when 15 people gathered in a rented shopping small space in Lake City for worship services. The group quickly began the process of acquiring land where something more permanent could be built. The first site selected was blocked because of resistance by the surrounding community. A second site was blocked for the same reason.Read More

Our Misson
  • Each individual upon leaving the temple , must leave at the higher level of God Consciousness then the level he/she arrived with.
  • He/she must realize, that all the ritual ceremonies were done according to the method given in the Vedas.
  • Temple will do its best to help those who request its help in all their religious and humanitarian needs and to achieve mental peace.
  • To celebrate all the hindu festivals on the correct days according to the panchangs ( Indian astrological and religious calendar describing all lunar activates and mahurats )

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